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After Effects Apprentice 16: Creating a Medical Opening Title
Illustration by John Hersey

Randomized lab results


From:

After Effects Apprentice 16: Creating a Medical Opening Title

with Chris Meyer and Trish Meyer

Video: Randomized lab results

For our next improvement I think I'd like to add a little bit of animation and interest to these lab result displays that are part of the background. Right now it's just static text and static numbers. Since we have animated Vital Signs and now an animated element in our background layer, I think it would be particularly cool if those values in the Vital Signs animated as well. Therefore, I'd like to replace those static numbers in the background with animating numbers. Well, there's a few ways of going about that. You might be tempted to initially to take one of your Lab Results layers and attempt to Layer>Pre-compose it.

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After Effects Apprentice 16: Creating a Medical Opening Title
3h 30m Intermediate Jan 17, 2013

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This project-oriented course leads you through the creative and technical process of building an opening title sequence from scratch in Adobe After Effects. Author Chris Meyer shows how to pull together numerous skills you've learned in the other After Effects Apprentice courses, from working in 3D space to creating type and shape layers to writing expressions. Along the way, Chris lets you in on the mental process he uses when creating similar spots for real-world clients, while sharing numerous tips that will help broaden your After Effects skills.

The After Effects Apprentice videos on lynda.com were created by Trish and Chris Meyer and are designed to be used on their own and as a companion to their book After Effects Apprentice. We are honored to host these tutorials in the lynda.com library.

Topics include:
  • Animating to music
  • Arranging layers in 3D space
  • Performing time stretches
  • Working with 3D camera tracking
  • Typesetting and animating text
  • Adding effects like drop shadows and motion blur
  • Creating and animating shape layers
  • Building and delivering a broadcast package
Subjects:
Video Motion Graphics Visual Effects
Software:
After Effects
Authors:
Chris Meyer Trish Meyer

Randomized lab results

For our next improvement I think I'd like to add a little bit of animation and interest to these lab result displays that are part of the background. Right now it's just static text and static numbers. Since we have animated Vital Signs and now an animated element in our background layer, I think it would be particularly cool if those values in the Vital Signs animated as well. Therefore, I'd like to replace those static numbers in the background with animating numbers. Well, there's a few ways of going about that. You might be tempted to initially to take one of your Lab Results layers and attempt to Layer>Pre-compose it.

The problem with this is that text layers don't necessarily follow the same rules as other layers. This will not let me leave all attributes in the Final Comp, it's going to insist that I move all attributes into the new composition, including its position and 3D space. That's going to make things messy, because then I'll need to have the camera back there, etcetera. So instead of pre-composing my text layer, I'm going to go ahead and just create a brand-new comp with the text already in it, then I can swap that comp back and place this text layer later on. You may remember that earlier on we did have this composition of all of the Lab Results.

That was a result of us importing a layered Photoshop file as a composition. That means this composition is already at the size that I'll need to swap in for the text layers later on. So I could start with just one layer in here and duplicate this comp and continue to work with it. I'll pick one layer of Lab Results, I'm going to note the font and the size that I use; Myriad Pro, Semi-Bold, 48 points, White color, and I'm going to get rid of the numbers for one these results.

Now it is possible to use a text layer and expressions to randomize the text or numbers displayed by that text layer. It's a tricky expression. Instead, I'm going to fall back on a very old school effect called Text>Numbers. Numbers is a great old way of creating numeric values that can indeed be keyframed or randomized. I'm going to change the Font to Myriad Pro, change the Style to Semi-Bold.

I think I'll go ahead and Right Justify just so I can keep decimal points lined up. Okay, this looks good. The default color is Red, which is not our color. I'll change it to White. The default point Size is 36, and I'll make it 48, and you will need to have some knowledge or forethought as to how many digits you want and what you want their range to be. I want Random numbers, which means this is going to randomize over time. I don't need any Decimal Places for this particular value, and I asked the person who created this layer for me originally, what would be a good minimum/maximum value for something such as the sodium reading.

They say a good maximum might be say 160, so I'll choose that. I'm even going to rename this particular effect Sodium so I know its value relates to the Sodium line in my final text. Well, my final problem is that I see my numbers, but I don't see the text underneath. To change that I need to enable Composite On Original. Now this effect will draw its result on top of the existing text layer. I scrub it into position. Actually I'm going to have it overlap my text so I can make sure I've got my Y Height the same.

That looks good. And then I'll scrub it back here in space until this X position looks correct. And I'll randomize in every frame. The default is Proportional Spacing; if I turn that off, the kerning can go a little bit wonky. You might prefer that look. I think that option of turning Proportional Spacing off actually works better with this particular font, although some of the kerning is a bit strange. If you find the spacing is too random, you can turn Proportional Spacing on and change the tracking to taste to make it look good.

That's a little bit tight. I'll change the tracking out a little bit. There we go. Now normally these numbers will randomize for every frame of your composition. If you want to slow them down, you can use an effect called Posterize Time or you can just change the frame rate of this comp. I'll type Cmd+K or Ctrl+K to open up the Composition Settings. I'll set the Frame Rate down to something a little slow, like our .8333 that we used for our wiggle speed earlier on. And most important of all when you're doing strange frame rates is you need to go underneath the Advanced tab and enable Preserve frame rate, that way you will keep this pre-comps frame rate even in the later composition.

If you do not enable this, it will take on the frame rate of your Final Comp and then you'll have these crazy fast animating numbers. I'll click OK, do a quick RAM Preview to see how I like that. That's feeling a bit slow for me, so I'm going to go back to my Composition Settings. I see it rounded .8333 up to 1 anyway; 1 is the minimum frame rate allowed in After Effects. Let's take .8333 times, let's say four times as fast, let's see how that looks.

Yeah, I think I like that pacing. So now that I've created one text layer, I can go to my next text layer, tab over its old value, go to my Numbers Effect, duplicate it, create a new copy for Glucose, change its Value range; maybe Glucose would have a maximum of only say 100, and scrub it down into position. Again, I might need to move it over or even use guides to see what is a good Y Height.

Once I've got that, I can put it back to the same X position as it was before, and things should more or less line up. RAM Preview and now we've got a couple of numbers changing. You can continue to do this for all of your values and create four comps for each of your Lab Results layers and then swap that back in for the Lab Results in your Final Comp. And I'll give you a little hint, if you don't feel like doing all that work yourself, if you dive into the Idea Corner folder, you'll find compositions that already have all of these ideas built for you.

In my final version I also decided to go down to a thinner version of Myriad Pro, just Regular, so it wouldn't look quite as heavy and dominant in the background.

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