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Preparing images for video in Photoshop

From: Video Production with Creative Suite 6

Video: Preparing images for video in Photoshop

Like Illustrator, Photoshop is an obvious choice as an application to generate assets for you editing in Premiere Pro and your post production work in After Effects. It's a powerful tool and allows you to produce complex layered images with 3D and animation now and even to work on video directly. If you're new to video editing, but you know Photoshop very well, there's no reason why you can't use this application to generate titles and graphics.

Preparing images for video in Photoshop

Like Illustrator, Photoshop is an obvious choice as an application to generate assets for you editing in Premiere Pro and your post production work in After Effects. It's a powerful tool and allows you to produce complex layered images with 3D and animation now and even to work on video directly. If you're new to video editing, but you know Photoshop very well, there's no reason why you can't use this application to generate titles and graphics.

If you go to the File menu and choose New, you've got the option of choosing a number of presets including film and video. And in those presets, you can choose a particular size. Now, I'm working with media that is 1280x720, so I'm going to choose this HDV stroke HDTV option. And you'll notice that when I choose these options, there's actually a frame rate listed as well. Don't worry too much about that frame rate. It's something you can change very easily later on in the Animation panel. Here, right away, you can see I've got a width and a height.

The pixels per inches isn't particularly important, but the color mode is. Of course, Photoshop supports quite a lot of different color modes. We're going to want RGB because that's the native color mode for Premiere Pro. We've also got the option of choosing whether we're going to work in 8-bit, 16, 32, or whatever. It's up to you, really. 8-bit is fine. That's what most standard video is. But if you really want to max out the quality, you can go for 32-bit. I suppose, at least, it's going to fit with the 32-bit 14-point processing possible inside of Premiere Pro. In all likelihood, you're going to want a transparent background, rather than a particular color or white.

Because then you can use that transparency as part of your composition inside of Premiere Pro. We also have the option to manage colors for the document. And this is exactly the same as any other kind of file. You might find it useful to set up the color management to display as, something like, this HDTV, this is the ITUC 709 color. So, you've got 0H255 color here or 16235 color which is the way UV color the scale here this is the 16235 option. This is standard definition.

And of course, you've got all these different kinds of film types, as well different kinds of film stock. If you do choose one of these, then you'll want to go to the View menu once you're into the file, and turn on the Proof Colors. That way, if you've got a profile for your monitor, Photoshop can give you an impression, at least, of how the colors are going to be displayed on your chosen monitor. I might as well choose that color profile, I want square pixels. Of course, because I'm working on an HD format that has square pixels. If you're working on a standard definition format, you'll want non-square pixels.

And I'm going to click OK. And here I am in my Photoshop document. And when you create a Photoshop document this way, Photoshop automatically gives you, they're quite faint. But it gives you the 10% and 20% safe action and safe title zone guides. These guides don't appear in the image. If I press Ctrl or Cmd+H, they're going to disappear from view. They're just there to help you lay out the contents of your graphics. The great thing about Photoshop being made by Adobe is that Adobe also make After Effects and Premiere Pro. So, the compatibility between those applications is particularly good. I'd recommend having as many layers as you like. Here, for example maybe I'll just make a simple gradient on the screen. In fact, let me make a little marquee selection.

I'm going to do a simple strap line here and I'll just fill that selection with, you know, this gradient will probably do. So, I'm just going to put some color across the screen. Then I'll just click to add some text. Let's call this Race Report. That's kind of small. So, I'll just select that and Click and Drag on the text here to increase the size. So, I'm not going to go for any wonderful art history here, but you can see on my Layers panel, I've got two layers here. And the great thing is that I can work with those independently when I'm in After Effects or Premiere Pro.

Up under the View menu, here I've got let me just confirm that text. I've got this option specify my proof setup, which by default is going to be working CMYK. If I go up to Custom, I can choose a specific device to simulate. And that includes things like, for example, a regular standard definition or High Definition TV. So,I can select that, click OK. And now under my View menu, I can turn off and on Proof Colors. Now, you many not see much difference.

But it's dependent on your computer monitor being setup with a proper profile that Photoshop can read and identify and compensate for. But at least, you've got that option, which is pretty powerful in your Graphics Editor. There's nothing you especially need to do to your Photoshop documents to make them compatible with Premiere Pro or After Effects. And things like layer effects are supported. So, if you do apply something like maybe an outer glow to your text. Let's a spread that out a bit okay suitably unsubtle, (LAUGH) click OK.

That'll turn up as well and be displayed in your editing application. So, you really do have all of the flexibility that Photoshop has to offer when your creating these files. And you don't have to make the images perfectly correct for your timeline as long as they fit. As with all rasterized graphics, it's a good idea to go bigger than you need rather then smaller. And then, increase the scale because things will start to look a little bit blocky. And if you want to make the Image Size selection super easy, if I toggle back over to Premiere Pro here under the File menu, I can chose to go to New and chose Photoshop file. And if I click on this, it's automatically going to show me the resolution and time base for my current sequence I've got right here. So if I click OK, this is going to ask me where I want to put the file. Let's put this with our other footage.

Let's have this under Graphics. Photoshop from PR, from Premiere. And then, here we are. We're looking at an image that's exactly right for our current sequence. And I'm a big fan of technologies that work this way, where I know it's correct, I just don't need really to know what it is. It's automatically been selected for me. Over in After Effects, I have a very similar option. Here's a project with a composition. I can go to the File menu and choose New and chose Adobe Photoshop file.

I get exactly the same options. Let's go to our media assets and graphics and let's say PS from AE, and there we go again. I've got a graphic file ready to be created, it's a PSD-based on the dimensions of my composition. So again, it just makes it super easy for you to get exactly the right settings without you understanding what they should be. Pretty much anything you can do in Photoshop, you can bring in to those other applications.

Worst case scenario, you'll go to the File menu if you're working on animated content, you choose Export > Render Video. And then, you can use the presets in the W Meter Encoder to create a video clip that you can import like any other into Premiere Pro or After Effects. So, that's preparing images for video in Photoshop CS6.

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This video is part of

Image for Video Production with Creative Suite 6
Video Production with Creative Suite 6

29 video lessons · 3569 viewers

Maxim Jago
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 1m 25s
    1. Welcome
      1m 25s
  2. 14m 1s
    1. Introduction to multi-application post-production
      4m 46s
    2. Dynamic Link vs. round-tripping
      5m 22s
    3. One-way trips and the Edit Original command
      3m 53s
  3. 10m 53s
    1. Improving speech-to-text analysis
      5m 57s
    2. Using breakdown reports
      4m 56s
  4. 13m 16s
    1. Organizing projects with Prelude
      7m 53s
    2. Sharing rough cuts with Premiere Pro
      5m 23s
  5. 21m 10s
    1. Browsing in Bridge
      8m 35s
    2. Batch renaming with Bridge
      7m 26s
    3. Editing metadata with Bridge
      5m 9s
  6. 19m 22s
    1. Preparing images for video in Illustrator
      8m 32s
    2. Using Illustrator files in After Effects
      6m 27s
    3. Using Illustrator files with the Premiere Pro Title tool
      4m 23s
  7. 24m 38s
    1. Preparing images for video in Photoshop
      7m 52s
    2. Working with Photoshop files in After Effects
      10m 11s
    3. Working with Photoshop files in Premiere Pro
      6m 35s
  8. 27m 52s
    1. Creating audio for video with Audition
      11m 45s
    2. Sending work from Premiere Pro to Audition
      6m 32s
    3. Round-tripping a soundtrack from Premiere Pro to Audition and back again
      9m 35s
  9. 31m 19s
    1. Preparing content for Premiere Pro in After Effects
      7m 54s
    2. Preparing content for After Effects in Premiere Pro
      3m 36s
    3. Sending work from Premiere Pro to After Effects
      11m 14s
    4. Sending work from After Effects to Premiere Pro
      8m 35s
  10. 14m 39s
    1. Outputting pregraded shots for the edit from SpeedGrade
      5m 40s
    2. Sending work from Premiere Pro to SpeedGrade
      8m 59s
  11. 7m 31s
    1. Using Dynamic Link to share sequences between Premiere Pro and Encore
      7m 31s
  12. 10m 13s
    1. Sending work from Premiere Pro to the Media Encoder
      7m 12s
    2. Using the Media Encoder to output from After Effects
      3m 1s

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