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Importing render passes into After Effects

From: Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

Video: Importing render passes into After Effects

We now are ready to move onto After Effects. So in project 1 we set the lights and camera to render out the spyglass. We also set up mental ray render passes to split out that render into multiple render pass layers within a layered PSD image sequence. So we are going to bring those renders into After Effects and also bring in the original footage that was shot with the actress. Before you do that in After Effects, though, I want to check a few things. One we want to make sure we are working in new project. So I am going to go to File > New > New Project. I am not going to save the old one, and then also I want to check to see where the settings are in terms of how the timeline is going to work.

Importing render passes into After Effects

We now are ready to move onto After Effects. So in project 1 we set the lights and camera to render out the spyglass. We also set up mental ray render passes to split out that render into multiple render pass layers within a layered PSD image sequence. So we are going to bring those renders into After Effects and also bring in the original footage that was shot with the actress. Before you do that in After Effects, though, I want to check a few things. One we want to make sure we are working in new project. So I am going to go to File > New > New Project. I am not going to save the old one, and then also I want to check to see where the settings are in terms of how the timeline is going to work.

Now since we are working with Image Sequences, it's often useful to not work in Time code, but to work in Frames. I'll show you where that is. If you go up to File > Project Settings, under Time Display Style, the option of Time code-- which is default--and also Frames. Frames are much easier to work with in this situation. So I'll click on Frames and click OK. Now we're ready to try to bring in some footage. Let's start with the live action. I am going to go to File > Import > File. The original footage is under the Footage folder under Shot1.

Now this is--once again--an image sequence, which means I have a folder full of 60 different frames. However, if I pick the first one, and if this option down here, Targa Sequence, is checked, which it is this by default, After Effects will actually bring in this series of images as a single unit. Now this does depend on numbering, and this is why it's important to choose a correct option in Maya. In the scene it says shot1.000.tga and so on. You have to make sure you have the same number numeric places for the number.

Three here for 000 and then three here for 001 and so on. If you follow that order, then After Effects will bring them in correctly. That's actually a frame padding option within the Render Settings of Maya. But so long as you render it correctly so the frames are in the correct order, After Effects will know what to do with them. So if I click Open, they'll come in as a single unit. You'll see right here shot1 from frame 0 to frame 59, you'll see up here all the various settings for that. It's 1920x1080. That's resolution. 60 frames in duration and 24 frame per second.

Now it's actually important to check the frames per second. Now in this case the video footage was shot at 24 frames. So that's great, it does match. But sometimes you might work in other frame rate like 30. So you want to double-check that at the start. Now it's possible to interpret each piece of footage to pick a different frame rate. If I go down to shot1, right mouse key and go to Interpret Footage and go to Main, there's a place to change the Frame Rate right here where it says Assume this frame rate. You can put in whatever frame rate makes sense. Now 24 works for us here, but you could put in 30 frame for instance, but that would be from the other project.

So 24 is good for us. I'm just going to get out of this window here. It's also possible to set the Global Preference, so it interprets all of the footage at the same frame rate. This is great for saving time. So this is actually up under Edit > Preferences > Imports. So if we go to Imports, there is a place where you can tell it to interpret a certain frame rate every single time we import. This is set to 24. Normally, it's set to 30, but you can change that at anytime. Again, we want 24. So if I leave it at 24 everything it will bring will be interpreted 24, which is perfect for project one.

So now we have shot1 which has the actress in it. Let's take a look at that. Now look at it. We need to set up a Composition. We have nothing right here in our Composition window. Now a quick way to set the Composition to make sure it's set correctly is to click-drag your footage and pull it down to where you have your layer stacked. When you let go, it creates a new composition, in this case shot1 which is the correct resolution, the correct duration, and also the correct frame rate. You can see that up here when that Composition is selected, it says the size right here or the resolution, the duration, and the frame rate.

Now you notice because we set the Time Option to Frames as opposed to Time code there's a frames read out right here on the timeline. So just count up from 0 all the up to 60. This is much easier for working with image sequences. Time code is really designed for video and doesn't make as much sense in this case. So there's a shot, and we can play it back this time or just scrub through it. Now since it's fairly large resolution it's going to look a little blocky as we're holding the Time slider through, but we can see that there's some motion there.

We'll talk more about playing back in later videos. So for right now let's go back and get the render of the spyglass. I'm going to go to the same place and go to File > Import > File. In this case the render is in the Renders folder under Shot1Monoculars in--it's the same deal. You pick the first frame of the image sequence, make sure the Sequence option is checked on, which it is in this case, and click Open. That's little bit different from layered PSD files, because they have multiple layers, you can either choose to merge all those layers or pick one layer and bring that in by itself.

We actually want to click the Choose layer button and then pick a layer. Here's all the render passes that have been converted to layers. Now we don't really want to MasterBeauty or Background. We want all the in-between ones. So I'm going to start with Shadow, pick that, click OK, and bring it in. It comes in as image sequence, but just that layer. You will see a layer name here and then the name of the file and of course the resolution, duration, frame rate up here. So let's go get additional ones. So there we have all the layers brought in, and because we did this in Maya in terms of the original render, each one of those layers creates a render pass.

Of course, we also have our original live action footage all brought in as the image sequences. We are sure that the compositions set correctly with the correct frame rates, correct resolution, correct duration. There's a second way to make a composition which is worth knowing, and that is to go up to Composition > New Composition. Underneath the composition here you have to make sure to pick the correct Resolution, the correct Frame Rate, and correct Duration yourself. Now for the resolution there are Presets, and we happen to have a preset here that matches, which is HDTV 1080 24.

But you might have other projects that use other resolutions and other frame rates and other durations. Now Duration is manually entered into this cell. I'm not going to create a composition now, because we are good to go, but this shows you can make one manually as opposed to dragging the footage down to the timeline. All right, so we have our footage brought in, both the render and live action. So we're ready to move onto the next step where we'll start to construct a more complex composite.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites
Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

34 video lessons · 5143 viewers

Lee Lanier
Author

 
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  1. 2m 0s
    1. Welcome
      47s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 13s
  2. 29m 49s
    1. Working with image sequences
      7m 24s
    2. Importing reference video as an image plane
      5m 13s
    3. Matching the 3D camera to the video footage
      4m 23s
    4. Lighting the model
      5m 35s
    5. Creating mattes and shadows in preparation for rendering
      7m 14s
  3. 15m 38s
    1. Using the Render Layer Editor
      4m 21s
    2. Splitting a scene into multiple render passes
      6m 6s
    3. Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides
      5m 11s
  4. 15m 2s
    1. Creating render passes using mental ray
      3m 50s
    2. Batch rendering render passes: Project one
      5m 24s
    3. Batch rendering render passes: Project two
      5m 48s
  5. 19m 4s
    1. Importing render passes into After Effects
      6m 25s
    2. Recombining render passes in a composition
      6m 31s
    3. Transforming multiple render passes as a single unit
      6m 8s
  6. 48m 7s
    1. Setting up a motion tracker
      5m 17s
    2. Using a tracker to analyze motion in footage
      3m 56s
    3. Adjusting tracker options for better results
      7m 2s
    4. Matching layer motion by applying tracker data
      6m 26s
    5. Refining a layer's transparency with rotoscoping
      6m 45s
    6. Improving layer movement with the Smoother tool
      5m 7s
    7. Improving the CG by adding blur and effects
      8m 7s
    8. Adding shadow to make the composite believable
      5m 27s
  7. 32m 36s
    1. Recombining render passes for project two
      5m 17s
    2. Removing unwanted elements with a garbage mask
      4m 57s
    3. Applying motion tracking data to a null layer
      6m 38s
    4. Adjusting shadows and matte edges
      8m 12s
    5. Using color correction to improve layer integration
      7m 32s
  8. 25m 46s
    1. Stabilizing shaky video with the Tracker
      8m 2s
    2. Tracking rectangular elements with the Perspective corner pin option
      5m 31s
    3. Adjusting corner pin points and paths
      6m 56s
    4. Applying corner pin data to multiple layers
      5m 17s
  9. 1m 16s
    1. Next steps
      1m 16s

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