New Feature: Playlist Center! Pick a topic and let our playlists guide the way—like a learning mixtape.

Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites
Illustration by John Hersey

Applying corner pin data to multiple layers


From:

Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

with Lee Lanier

Video: Applying corner pin data to multiple layers

We have adjusted the screen animation to better match the footage of the PDA. Now since we have used motion tracking to move that screen around, we can use that data and apply it to another layer to make that move in conjunction with the screen. For example, with this project there is a render of a Wireframe ship, and we can bring in and make it look like it's a hologram floating above the PDA, so let's do that. We go to File > Import > File and retrieve the Shot4Ship animation. Now I want to bring in so it will look a little different.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 0s
    1. Welcome
      47s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 13s
  2. 29m 49s
    1. Working with image sequences
      7m 24s
    2. Importing reference video as an image plane
      5m 13s
    3. Matching the 3D camera to the video footage
      4m 23s
    4. Lighting the model
      5m 35s
    5. Creating mattes and shadows in preparation for rendering
      7m 14s
  3. 15m 38s
    1. Using the Render Layer Editor
      4m 21s
    2. Splitting a scene into multiple render passes
      6m 6s
    3. Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides
      5m 11s
  4. 15m 2s
    1. Creating render passes using mental ray
      3m 50s
    2. Batch rendering render passes: Project one
      5m 24s
    3. Batch rendering render passes: Project two
      5m 48s
  5. 19m 4s
    1. Importing render passes into After Effects
      6m 25s
    2. Recombining render passes in a composition
      6m 31s
    3. Transforming multiple render passes as a single unit
      6m 8s
  6. 48m 7s
    1. Setting up a motion tracker
      5m 17s
    2. Using a tracker to analyze motion in footage
      3m 56s
    3. Adjusting tracker options for better results
      7m 2s
    4. Matching layer motion by applying tracker data
      6m 26s
    5. Refining a layer's transparency with rotoscoping
      6m 45s
    6. Improving layer movement with the Smoother tool
      5m 7s
    7. Improving the CG by adding blur and effects
      8m 7s
    8. Adding shadow to make the composite believable
      5m 27s
  7. 32m 36s
    1. Recombining render passes for project two
      5m 17s
    2. Removing unwanted elements with a garbage mask
      4m 57s
    3. Applying motion tracking data to a null layer
      6m 38s
    4. Adjusting shadows and matte edges
      8m 12s
    5. Using color correction to improve layer integration
      7m 32s
  8. 25m 46s
    1. Stabilizing shaky video with the Tracker
      8m 2s
    2. Tracking rectangular elements with the Perspective corner pin option
      5m 31s
    3. Adjusting corner pin points and paths
      6m 56s
    4. Applying corner pin data to multiple layers
      5m 17s
  9. 1m 16s
    1. Next steps
      1m 16s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
please wait ...
Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites
3h 9m Intermediate Aug 17, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this course, professional animator and director Lee Lanier shows how to create render passes in Autodesk Maya, recombine the passes in Adobe After Effects, and motion track the passes to live-action video footage that contains a moving camera or a moving character. The course covers both the Render Layer Editor and mental ray contribution pass systems. Additionally, 1- and 2-point motion tracking and match moving, stabilization, and 4-point corner pin tracking are discussed.

Topics include:
  • Working with image sequences
  • Matching the 3D camera to video footage
  • Lighting models in Maya
  • Splitting a scene into multiple render passes
  • Batch rendering
  • Recombining render passes in an After Effects composition
  • Setting up motion trackers
  • Refining layers with rotoscoping
  • Adding blur and effects
  • Adjusting shadows and matte edges
  • Using color correction
  • Stabilizing shaky video
Subjects:
3D + Animation Rendering Textures Video Materials Compositing Visual Effects
Software:
After Effects Maya
Author:
Lee Lanier

Applying corner pin data to multiple layers

We have adjusted the screen animation to better match the footage of the PDA. Now since we have used motion tracking to move that screen around, we can use that data and apply it to another layer to make that move in conjunction with the screen. For example, with this project there is a render of a Wireframe ship, and we can bring in and make it look like it's a hologram floating above the PDA, so let's do that. We go to File > Import > File and retrieve the Shot4Ship animation. Now I want to bring in so it will look a little different.

So far we have used layered PSD files. However, when I bring this one in, we'll see a new window pop up, and this is the Interpret Footage window. Now layered PSD converts the Alpha Channel automatically and knows what to do with that. However, when you bring in some other file format like a Targa or TIFF, it's going to pop up this window if it senses that there is an Alpha Channel. And what it's asking is is the Alpha premultiplied or not? Now when you render something in Maya, it pre-multiplies the Alpha, that means the values of the Alpha are multiplied by the color channels, and this is just done for efficiency and for higher-quality edges.

So if you see this window and the render has come out of a program like Maya, go ahead and pick Premultiplied, that will give you the best result. So Premultiplied, click OK, here comes the footage. We'll drop this around top of the composite, that's going to be too short. I'm going to back my slider up so we can see it. It's basically this Wireframe ship, and because it's so short, it's only 30 frames, what we need to do is loop it. And this animation is designed to repeat over and over as it spins around. So I'm going to go to the footage itself, up here in the Project panel, right mouse key, and go to the Interpret Footage, and then Main.

This way you can change your frame rate, but also you can make the footage loop. In fact, there's a loop down here at the very bottom. So I'm going to loop this three times and then hit Enter to close this window. So now the bar has stretched out, now the breakout of the bar is still short, so I need to grab the end of this and click-drag it so it fills the entire duration. So now it repeats three times and will spin three times on the screen. So let's move this and scale it so it looks like it might be a hologram, say, on top of this PDA.

I am going to scale it down. I'll go to the Scale, under the Transform, scale it down to 70%. I'm going to move it, so it looks like it's near just above the PDA right here. A good place to test is at frame 58, that's where the nose of the ship is pointing straight down. So I'll move it up some place around this area. Now it's a little light, we can try to experiment with blending modes to get this shot better and then apply some effects to it. I'm going to switch over to the Blending mode menu that's hidden now. I'll toggle the switches one more time and get to that.

Let's try Screen, that makes it kind of interesting, where it's a little bit lighter over the background ground, but darker over the screen itself. The other thing we can do to integrate this is just to activate Motion Blur. So I'm going to toggle my switches again, activate Motion Blur, now eventually this is going to move along with the screen, so I need to blur it also. Now it's not actually moving, what I can do is parent this to the Screen layer and therefore, I'll inherit the same animation that the screen has, and the screen got that from the Motion Tracking. So I'm going to switch to Parent menu to Screen.

Now if I play it back, you'll see that it follows the screen the entire time, even at the beginning when there is a lot of blur. It's blurred because of the Motion Blur, and because of the way we positioned the scale that render, it looks like at some place just above the screen, as if it's floating. Now it's still a little dim, it's hard to see, so what we can do is apply an effect to make that a little bit glowy and more bright. In fact, there is a Glow effect. So with that chip layer selected, I'm going to go up to Effect > Stylize > Glow. And you can see already, it's starting to get brighter and a little bit more glowy-looking.

So you can play around with the threshold and the radius and the intensity. Threshold determines what pixels get glowed and which ones are ignored. The radius is the size of the blurry glow, how far it goes away from the original render. Intensity is just the strength of the glow. So let's try a threshold of 20, a radius of 45, and an intensity of 2. So now it's little bit more visible. Whole we are at it, we can use this glow and apply to the screen itself, and you can copy effects from one layer to another, so I can highlight this Glow effect here and do a copy.

I can do Edit > Copy from the menu and then go down to my screen layer, highlight that so that screen layer is selected, and then Edit > Paste. That glow is transferred down to the screen. Looks like that gets a bit strong, so I can adjust that. It's right here in the Effects Control Panel, I can experiment with making it a little less intense, so there we go. So we have added our additional ship render, we have scaled and positioned it to make it look like it might be a hologram, we adjust its blending mode, and applied a glow to it to make it look like it was glowing along with the screen.

We now have our futuristic PDA. So we started off with the blank screen, and now we have this cool animation, let's play it back. So tracking is great anytime you need to track something on to a rectangular feature like this PDA. And of course, all the effects can really help integrate that CG render, so it matches live-action much better.

There are currently no FAQs about Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites.

 
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

join now Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Notes cannot be added for locked videos.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.