Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Adjusting corner pin points and paths

From: Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

Video: Adjusting corner pin points and paths

We applied the motion tracking tool with corner pin options to track the screen onto the PDA in the actress' hand. Let's take a look at our movie so far. So it's tracking pretty well, but there are definitely areas we can improve to make the integration better. If I go to a non-blurred frame, one thing that pops out is the fact that there is a strange gap at the edge of the screen. There is a new screen animation on top of the old screen edge, and that edge kind of shows through and looks a little strange. What might be nice here is to stretch the screen out a little bit more to cover up that old screen to get rid of that edge.

Adjusting corner pin points and paths

We applied the motion tracking tool with corner pin options to track the screen onto the PDA in the actress' hand. Let's take a look at our movie so far. So it's tracking pretty well, but there are definitely areas we can improve to make the integration better. If I go to a non-blurred frame, one thing that pops out is the fact that there is a strange gap at the edge of the screen. There is a new screen animation on top of the old screen edge, and that edge kind of shows through and looks a little strange. What might be nice here is to stretch the screen out a little bit more to cover up that old screen to get rid of that edge.

So one trick for doing that is to adjust the corner pin properties and move this set of keyframe as single units. So let's go down to the layer first, expand the Effects and look at the corner pin animation. So again, we have the four corners here, upper left, right, lower left, lower right, here's all of the keyframes. There are so many keyframes, we don't really want to adjust them here in the timeline, so another trick is to go into the Graph Editor, where we have more control. So what we'll do is we'll edit one corner at a time and offset the curve in both the X and the Y so that the corner on the screen appears in different place.

So, how do you go into the graph editor? Well, first pick a curve you want to work with or property you want to work with. For example, maybe we want to start with the lower left corner. I'm going to click this Include this property and graph button right here, so it turns dark. Next thing I'll do is go to the big Graph Editor button here, which switches to the graph editor view, so I'll click that and here's the view. Now the way it works is the red curve is the X, it's the traditional way that After Effects colors these, so you have the X value here and the Y value here, and you have the curve that results from that in the graph editor.

The cover is made up of a bunch of keyframes very close together, and the curve just threads through those keyframes to show you the result. Now in terms the way that graph editor works as for its values, the frames run left to right. The value that's stored by the keyframe, values run from 0 above 100. So there is particular keyframe, maybe this one right here I just clicked on it, well, you can figure out the value by reading down to up on the graph, so it has a value of around 150, 160. Its frame number is determined by the left or right motion, so this is frame 36.

All right, so what we do with the curves now we have them? We want to move these curves as single units, so what I can do is drag a marquee selection box around the curve, so let's start with the Y. I'm going to click right here in the empty space and form a marquee box, highlight the entire curve and let go, turns to deep gold yellow, which means it's selected. I can then move this curve straight up or straight down. Now I'll change the values of all the keyframes in that direction, so I'm going to click right here and drag straight down. You can see it goes up in the Y in the viewer.

If it goes opposite direction, it goes down, in this case I want to go down. Now you have to careful not to go left or right, that'll change what frame number it's on, that'd be bad, so just be careful. So there I pull that curve down, that's great! Now I can go and get the X curve, select the entire X curve and then pull that up or down to make it go further left. When I say left, I mean left in the viewer, so there it's going further left, to where that corner is. So it looks pretty good. Now what we will do is do that for the other three corners.

Now it's going to take a little while, so we're going to skip ahead, and we'll come back to that completed. All right, so now we're coming back after I have adjusted all four of the corners to the corner pin section in the graph editor. For each of these four, I have gone in and adjusted the X and Y curves. Now I can see them all at once, but what I do is go through one at a time. So Upper Left, Upper Right, Lower Left, Lower Right. Now once these are adjusted, you can see that that all of the edge is now covered up, that looks a lot better now. So I can go out of the graph editor and work on the next step.

So let's look on ways to integrating the screen render better, so looks like it's actually in the live-action footage. First thing we can do is activate motion blur. This track screen is ruined quite a bit, so motion blur would help us with the blurriness, especially at the beginning, so when I turn on the motion blur for the screen layer, now it's in by default, so I can go down to Toggle Switches and show that again. So I want to turn on Motion Blur right here for that layer, and also motion blur for the entire composition. Once we do that and I go to an earlier frame, you can see there is lot of blur.

In fact, there is so much blur there, it looks like the screen is popping off the top now. This would be a good place to adjust the corners individually for individual frames. So as we click the Corner Pin section, you'll see these four circles, you can move those interactively. So if I zoom in here, and just click, say this corner up here, I can move it around. They don't want to do this for all the frames, but for just a few frames it's not that bad. So I'm going to adjust this so that the blur doesn't quite go that far.

I'll do that for the bottom ones also and go to the next frame. It's mainly the top that's looking a little strange. Set the frame 3, it should be pretty good. Let's take a look, okay, not to bad. So now we have added motion blur to get that very, very blurry beginning and also adjusted those corners so it looks like the screen fits better at the start. So what can we do to improve the integration? Let's move to a non-blurred frame. Well, right now the screen animation is very crisp. One thing you can do is reduce the opacity on that layer and let some of the phone show through, let's do that. I'm going to Transform here on that layer, reduce the Opacity to 80.

When I do that, some of the colors sneaks through and actually that fades out a bit, I think it make the screen more integrated. Now if you had a reflection on the original PDA, then that reflection will also show through, so it's a good trick when you have something that reflective where you are replacing the screen. Now I can also add a regular blur to the entire screen just to soften the letters and little graphics, I think it's a little too sharp now. So I'll apply Gaussian Blur to the layer, so Effect > Blur & Sharpen > Gaussian Blur, probably a fairly subtle blur will work. Let's try it 1, so just a little blur to soften it, I think it looks better.

Now speaking of blur, the edges are very sharp still, in other words, the edge of the original animation that was stretched to fit the screen is still pretty sharp, that's why I softened it. Now since the Alpha is working correctly here, the way I do that is apply a special blur that just works in the Alpha by itself, and there is something called Channel Blur for that. So if I go up to Effect > Blur & Sharpen, I can apply Channel Blur. Now Channel Blur allows you to blur any channel, including the red, green, or blue. We just want to blur the Alpha, so I'm going to change that value.

Let's try 3, so just by blurring the Alpha Matte or the Alpha Channel by small amount and see the edge gets softer, that looks much better. We have adjusted the Corner Pin Tracking to make the screen fit the edges of the PDA much better, we also added some additional blurs and manipulated the opacity to get the animation to feel like it was shot in the same original scene.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites
Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

34 video lessons · 5224 viewers

Lee Lanier
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 0s
    1. Welcome
      47s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 13s
  2. 29m 49s
    1. Working with image sequences
      7m 24s
    2. Importing reference video as an image plane
      5m 13s
    3. Matching the 3D camera to the video footage
      4m 23s
    4. Lighting the model
      5m 35s
    5. Creating mattes and shadows in preparation for rendering
      7m 14s
  3. 15m 38s
    1. Using the Render Layer Editor
      4m 21s
    2. Splitting a scene into multiple render passes
      6m 6s
    3. Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides
      5m 11s
  4. 15m 2s
    1. Creating render passes using mental ray
      3m 50s
    2. Batch rendering render passes: Project one
      5m 24s
    3. Batch rendering render passes: Project two
      5m 48s
  5. 19m 4s
    1. Importing render passes into After Effects
      6m 25s
    2. Recombining render passes in a composition
      6m 31s
    3. Transforming multiple render passes as a single unit
      6m 8s
  6. 48m 7s
    1. Setting up a motion tracker
      5m 17s
    2. Using a tracker to analyze motion in footage
      3m 56s
    3. Adjusting tracker options for better results
      7m 2s
    4. Matching layer motion by applying tracker data
      6m 26s
    5. Refining a layer's transparency with rotoscoping
      6m 45s
    6. Improving layer movement with the Smoother tool
      5m 7s
    7. Improving the CG by adding blur and effects
      8m 7s
    8. Adding shadow to make the composite believable
      5m 27s
  7. 32m 36s
    1. Recombining render passes for project two
      5m 17s
    2. Removing unwanted elements with a garbage mask
      4m 57s
    3. Applying motion tracking data to a null layer
      6m 38s
    4. Adjusting shadows and matte edges
      8m 12s
    5. Using color correction to improve layer integration
      7m 32s
  8. 25m 46s
    1. Stabilizing shaky video with the Tracker
      8m 2s
    2. Tracking rectangular elements with the Perspective corner pin option
      5m 31s
    3. Adjusting corner pin points and paths
      6m 56s
    4. Applying corner pin data to multiple layers
      5m 17s
  9. 1m 16s
    1. Next steps
      1m 16s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Join now "Already a member? Log in

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Your file was successfully uploaded.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.