Start learning with our library of video tutorials taught by experts. Get started

Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides


From:

Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites

with Lee Lanier

Video: Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides

Once you start using the Render layer Editor in creating custom layers, you can do a lot with just the render pass options to create render passes. However, there are a limited number of options there in terms of Diffuse, Shadow, Specular, and so on. You can create more complex render passes if you use some Material Overrides. Material Overrides is the option to the Render layer Editor to assign material to entire layer temporarily. Beyond that you can also use Render Overrides. Render Overrides give you the option to render out a particular layer with very specific render settings that are unique to that layer. So let's give that a try.
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 0s
    1. Welcome
      47s
    2. Using the exercise files
      1m 13s
  2. 29m 49s
    1. Working with image sequences
      7m 24s
    2. Importing reference video as an image plane
      5m 13s
    3. Matching the 3D camera to the video footage
      4m 23s
    4. Lighting the model
      5m 35s
    5. Creating mattes and shadows in preparation for rendering
      7m 14s
  3. 15m 38s
    1. Using the Render Layer Editor
      4m 21s
    2. Splitting a scene into multiple render passes
      6m 6s
    3. Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides
      5m 11s
  4. 15m 2s
    1. Creating render passes using mental ray
      3m 50s
    2. Batch rendering render passes: Project one
      5m 24s
    3. Batch rendering render passes: Project two
      5m 48s
  5. 19m 4s
    1. Importing render passes into After Effects
      6m 25s
    2. Recombining render passes in a composition
      6m 31s
    3. Transforming multiple render passes as a single unit
      6m 8s
  6. 48m 7s
    1. Setting up a motion tracker
      5m 17s
    2. Using a tracker to analyze motion in footage
      3m 56s
    3. Adjusting tracker options for better results
      7m 2s
    4. Matching layer motion by applying tracker data
      6m 26s
    5. Refining a layer's transparency with rotoscoping
      6m 45s
    6. Improving layer movement with the Smoother tool
      5m 7s
    7. Improving the CG by adding blur and effects
      8m 7s
    8. Adding shadow to make the composite believable
      5m 27s
  7. 32m 36s
    1. Recombining render passes for project two
      5m 17s
    2. Removing unwanted elements with a garbage mask
      4m 57s
    3. Applying motion tracking data to a null layer
      6m 38s
    4. Adjusting shadows and matte edges
      8m 12s
    5. Using color correction to improve layer integration
      7m 32s
  8. 25m 46s
    1. Stabilizing shaky video with the Tracker
      8m 2s
    2. Tracking rectangular elements with the Perspective corner pin option
      5m 31s
    3. Adjusting corner pin points and paths
      6m 56s
    4. Applying corner pin data to multiple layers
      5m 17s
  9. 1m 16s
    1. Next steps
      1m 16s

Watch this entire course now—plus get access to every course in the library. Each course includes high-quality videos taught by expert instructors.

Become a member
Please wait...
Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites
3h 9m Intermediate Aug 17, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

In this course, professional animator and director Lee Lanier shows how to create render passes in Autodesk Maya, recombine the passes in Adobe After Effects, and motion track the passes to live-action video footage that contains a moving camera or a moving character. The course covers both the Render Layer Editor and mental ray contribution pass systems. Additionally, 1- and 2-point motion tracking and match moving, stabilization, and 4-point corner pin tracking are discussed.

Topics include:
  • Working with image sequences
  • Matching the 3D camera to video footage
  • Lighting models in Maya
  • Splitting a scene into multiple render passes
  • Batch rendering
  • Recombining render passes in an After Effects composition
  • Setting up motion trackers
  • Refining layers with rotoscoping
  • Adding blur and effects
  • Adjusting shadows and matte edges
  • Using color correction
  • Stabilizing shaky video
Subjects:
3D + Animation Rendering Textures Video Materials Compositing Visual Effects
Software:
After Effects Maya
Author:
Lee Lanier

Adding flexibility by assigning material and render overrides

Once you start using the Render layer Editor in creating custom layers, you can do a lot with just the render pass options to create render passes. However, there are a limited number of options there in terms of Diffuse, Shadow, Specular, and so on. You can create more complex render passes if you use some Material Overrides. Material Overrides is the option to the Render layer Editor to assign material to entire layer temporarily. Beyond that you can also use Render Overrides. Render Overrides give you the option to render out a particular layer with very specific render settings that are unique to that layer. So let's give that a try.

So I have gone back to shot 1_layers2 and here we have our three custom layers, and they are all set to different render passes, one's Diffuse, one's Specular, and one's Shadow. In this case, Specular is on the top, Shadow is in the center, and Diffuse is on the bottom above the master layer. All of those layers are turned on the render. Now we can create a brand-new layer and assign a custom Material Override. So what I will do is I am going to copy just this monolayer here, the Diffuse layer, right mouse key, Copy layer. There is a brand-new layer. I am going to turn off all my layers in terms of rendering except for that new layer.

For the Material Override, I can right mouse key, and there is an Overrides menu. If I go further, there is Create New Material Override, and then you get a long list of all the materials inside Maya. The first few are Maya materials, and you have a long list of mental ray materials. You can pick anyone's of those materials. For example, if we want to create a special layer that renders all the mattes --and matte being a solid black and white renderer you can use in compositing to cut something out--what I can do is go up to Surface Shader and select that. Once I select that material, that material is assigned to everything on that layer.

In fact, the color changes instantaneously. Now it's pure black right now, but if I change the color of the surface shader, we will be able to see it. So I am going to go to the Hypershade, and that material I assign is the last one on the list. So I can double-click that, open its attribute editor, and then change its color. Now the surface shader of the color is set by the Out Color. So I can change that to White, and that's more useful in this case. Then close the Hypershade and do a test render. I am going to go back to the Channel Box though, because I want to double-check my options on my render layer.

I am going to go to Options > Render All layers, look at the option box. Right now, I am set to Composite and keep layers. Now I only have one layer that's going to render here. So I can actually just go to composite layers. That's fine. Hit Apply, and then hit Close. So I am going to render out this window here, and there it is. This is your custom matte pass. What you have is a solid white object over a black field, and that's all in RGB. You can use that in the composite later on to cut something out, and actually for this particular project, this becomes very useful. So when it comes to assigning Material Overrides, you can pick any material that you might find useful, again, to assign to all of the surfaces on that layer, it's only temporary--or I should say it's nonpermanent--because if I go down to the master layer, all original materials are still there and unaffected.

I also mentioned it's possible to create custom render passes by altering the render settings for a particular layer. There is a different way of doing that. For example, if I turn off this layer and go back down to my original monolayer, turn that back on, what I do is click this third icon button, which is a Render Settings Override button, and click that. That actually brings up the Render Settings window. However, in a special layer mode. In fact, you can tell that by going up here and looking at the title bar. It says Render Settings (monolayer). That means that these are the render settings just for this layer.

You can create an override for any of the attributes that appear here. So for example, I can switch the Render Using to a different rendering engine just for this layer. How do you do that? Well, you right mouse key over an attribute name, like this, Render Using right mouse key, and choose Create layer Override. As soon as you choose that option, that particular name turns orange. Once it's orange, I can pick a different option like mental ray. It switches to mental ray. That means that just this layer is using mental ray, because this is an override.

Now to remove that override you can right mouse key again over the name and remove it, but as long as it's orange that's a unique override for that layer. Every layer can have a different set of overrides. You simply click one of these buttons right here with a little clapboard and then choose an attribute right mouse key and then Create the Override. So now if I was to render out all these various layers, even if they are all on, only this one is going to use mental ray. The other ones use Maya software by default, because we go back to the master layer, the master layer has a default setting. So any layer that does not have an override uses the master layer as reference.

In fact, the master layer has a tab for every single rendering engine on it. So it serves as the master. Note that using the Render layer Editor to create render passes and to use Material Overrides and/or Render Settings is just one solution for breaking up the render into different passes where you have different shading components. We also have the mental ray contribution map system, which we are going to talk about in the next chapter. So using the Render layer Editor is really just for your knowledge. It's very good to know that, understand how it works. We are going to use a mental ray system for project 1 and project 2.

There are currently no FAQs about Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites.

Share a link to this course
Please wait... Please wait...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.
Upgrade now


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Upgrade now

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Maya Rendering for After Effects Composites.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Welcome to the redesigned course page.

We’ve moved some things around, and now you can



Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked