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Using drawing markups

From: Up and Running with Acrobat XI

Video: Using drawing markups

When you're marking up something for corrections most of the time you're going to find that the sticky note helps and the text highlighter helps, but sometimes you might want to use some of the other tools, just so it's clear what you need to correct. If you click on Comment, the Commenting pane wakes up, and it shows you that there are a number of annotation tools and then there's what are called Drawing Markups. And the Drawing Markup tools are a bit more like real-world tools, taking a red marker and making an indication on a proof that something needs to be changed. First, I am going to show you the text markups.

Using drawing markups

When you're marking up something for corrections most of the time you're going to find that the sticky note helps and the text highlighter helps, but sometimes you might want to use some of the other tools, just so it's clear what you need to correct. If you click on Comment, the Commenting pane wakes up, and it shows you that there are a number of annotation tools and then there's what are called Drawing Markups. And the Drawing Markup tools are a bit more like real-world tools, taking a red marker and making an indication on a proof that something needs to be changed. First, I am going to show you the text markups.

Here, I am going to move my cursor over between words and images, where there should be a comma. And just like I would in a word processing program, I'm going to click and then I am going to type what should be in there, a little tiny comma. Now, that could be kind of hard to see in a long document, that one little tiny request for correction. I am going to show you later a way to harvest all these comments and see them in a very easy, readable form. For now, I am just going to close that note. Here, this text is all crammed together. I need for it to be a little bit bigger and spread out so that it's more readable.

So I'm going to choose to use a really amusing little markup that's called the Polygon tool, and it lets you draw what looks like a little cloud. Or it looks like a doily; it kind of depends on your interpretation. When you're done just click and it connects. You can make it a little wider. So if I choose Properties when I right-click, I can change the Thickness, and you will see it's starting to be a little more apparent. I can also change the style of the cloud. I guess that's Cumulus, that's Nimbus, and then you can have little dashed lines, which are some form of Morse code.

Honestly, it's whatever is obvious. I think that's the important thing. You want to make sure that you call somebody's attention to this. And then I could change the color of it if I want. I am going to go back to my bright green. And there's no note attached, but again I can right-click, choose Open Pop-Up Note, and I am going to say, "make text larger and fix line spacing." There we go. So she will know what to do with that. There are some other tools that are sort of handy, like the Pencil tool.

I think it's the one that's most like real life. I just want to indicate that this gradient, this orange gradient that goes on top of the image, is really hiding some detail back there. So I draw, just like I would with a marker, and then I can right-click, Open my Pop-Up Note, and say, "lighten gradient to show photo," and then close my pop-up note. And again, I can right-click on that marker and I can choose Properties, I can change the color, and I can change the weight of it so it's more apparent.

So at the end of this, I have the choice of either sending this marked-up PDF back to my collaborator and that sort of fills up her inbox, or I could sort of peel up these markups and send her only the markups, and that's going to be much a smaller file, but you will still be able to use it. So I will show you how I could do that. In the Comments pane down here, look for this little icon, the Options icon, and under the Options, I can choose Export All to Data File. That means export all of my markups. Now this is just a one-page document, but it could be a 50-page document, and it would harvest all the markups.

So when I choose that--and I am just going to put it on my desktop, and I am just going to call it MyMarkups, for lack of a better name--and look closely. It's not saving it as a PDF; it's saving it as FDF. And if you're curious, that stands for Forms Data Format. But all that really matters is that it's just harvested the markups and it's only carrying them, which means it's going to be a very small file size. So when I click Save, now it saved all those markups. So what would she see on the other end? I'm going to revert this file so that it's back before any of the markups, so this is mimicking what she'd see on her screen.

Over here in the Comments list, because I've sent her the comments separately, I can choose Import Data File. I can find my MyMarkups file. See, it's only 5K, a little bitty file. When I click Open, look what it does. It places all the comments in their correct position, and now she can see what I marked up, but I didn't load up her mailbox with an enormous attachment to the email. Then there's one more way that might be sort of helpful when you're trying to figure out what multiple people have asked for. So I just have one set of markups here, but this function still is helpful.

Underneath this little option, I can choose Create Comment Summary. So I have some options about how it's going to create this. There is Documents and comments with connector lines on separate pages. Well, then I'd have to tape them together. That's no fun. Document and comments with connector lines on single pages, I kill less trees. Just the comments, well, that's efficient, but then I don't have the visual relationship with the content, so I'm not crazy about that. Document and comments with sequence numbers, at least I could map the common markups to the content.

This is my favorite: Document and comments with connector lines on single pages. So the goal is to have something that's a good reference as I go back to the original file and start to make these requested corrections. For Font Size, I recommend you choose Large, and even then, they're kind of tiny. I want all the comments. If there were pages with no comments in a multipage file, it might be easier to wade through if you eliminate the pages that don't have markups. Your choice. By default, it's going to include those. And here again, it's just a one-page file. The Connector Line, when you look at this little thumbnail, that's the line that goes between the comment text and the location it refers to. I recommend that you make that something a little more obvious, like red. And now I am going to ask it to create the Comment Summary.

So I am going to zoom in on this so you can see what's going on. Here are on my markups. You can see the red connector lines. It says who made the markup, what kind of markup it is. It even goes down to the second when markup was made, and you can see, too, it has the text that would have been in the pop-up note. Now this little spec here indicates that little comma. It's still a pretty small target, but I think it's easier to pick out of the pack here in the summary than it is as the little tiny markup in the page. So for me, this is a great roadmap when I go to make my corrections. Right now it's something that Acrobat has created, and it's stored only in RAM, so if the power goes out I lose it.

So I want to save this in the job folder so that I can use this as a reference. So to recap, I did my markups, I exported only the markups as a little FDF file and sent them to her, she imported the FDF into the PDF, it puts my markups where they ought to be, and then to have a nice overview of what needs to be done, made a summary of those comments, and then I would save this PDF, and then that becomes my reference for the corrections I have to make. I think you're going to find this really handy, and it doesn't kill trees.

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This video is part of

Image for Up and Running with Acrobat XI
Up and Running with Acrobat XI

37 video lessons · 10094 viewers

Claudia McCue
Author

 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 1m 3s
    1. Welcome
      47s
    2. Using the exercise files
      16s
  2. 9m 13s
    1. Understanding the Portable Document Format
      1m 55s
    2. Comparing the three versions of Acrobat
      7m 18s
  3. 16m 11s
    1. Navigating through documents
      4m 57s
    2. Changing the screen view
      7m 29s
    3. Understanding the Tool panels
      3m 45s
  4. 15m 45s
    1. Combining PDFs
      2m 57s
    2. Inserting pages
      2m 33s
    3. Replacing pages
      1m 59s
    4. Changing page order
      1m 29s
    5. Extracting pages
      1m 47s
    6. Creating portfolios
      5m 0s
  5. 16m 28s
    1. Creating PDFs from Word documents
      8m 20s
    2. Creating PDFs from PowerPoint presentations
      3m 5s
    3. Creating PDFs from Excel spreadsheets
      2m 0s
    4. Creating PDFs on a Mac
      3m 3s
  6. 14m 1s
    1. Converting web pages to PDFs
      3m 43s
    2. Scanning hard copy
      5m 27s
    3. Creating PDFs from text and image files
      1m 37s
    4. Converting selected areas of a document and clipboard contents into a PDF
      1m 49s
    5. Printing to PDF
      1m 25s
  7. 9m 43s
    1. Exporting PDF documents to Word
      3m 4s
    2. Exporting PDF documents to Excel
      1m 22s
    3. Exporting PDF documents to PowerPoint
      3m 0s
    4. Extracting images
      2m 17s
  8. 13m 21s
    1. Editing text
      3m 3s
    2. Editing graphics
      2m 38s
    3. Adding hyperlinks
      3m 23s
    4. Adding bookmarks
      4m 17s
  9. 17m 4s
    1. Adding annotations
      2m 32s
    2. Using drawing markups
      6m 48s
    3. Creating email reviews
      3m 26s
    4. Using shared reviews
      4m 18s
  10. 4m 23s
    1. Understanding interactive forms
      2m 27s
    2. Creating forms from Word documents
      1m 56s
  11. 58s
    1. Next steps
      58s

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