Easy-to-follow video tutorials help you learn software, creative, and business skills.Become a member

Creating a varnish

From: Print Production Essentials: Spot Colors and Varnish

Video: Creating a varnish

In this project, I'd like to accentuate the flower shapes and the little ampersand, but I don't want to have those components compete with the type. I don't want to make them darker. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to apply a spot varnish. First, I'm going to create the varnish color. Now, there isn't a varnish, book. So there really isn't any place you can pick an existing varnish color from. You just make your own. So here in the Color panel, I tend to like to make them bright green just because I think it makes it obvious that it's not part of the real artwork, that it's something separate. It's up to you what color you pick.

Creating a varnish

In this project, I'd like to accentuate the flower shapes and the little ampersand, but I don't want to have those components compete with the type. I don't want to make them darker. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to apply a spot varnish. First, I'm going to create the varnish color. Now, there isn't a varnish, book. So there really isn't any place you can pick an existing varnish color from. You just make your own. So here in the Color panel, I tend to like to make them bright green just because I think it makes it obvious that it's not part of the real artwork, that it's something separate. It's up to you what color you pick.

I'm going to add it to the Swatches panel and I'm going to name it varnish and by the way, if I were going to incorporate this with other pieces of artwork. And in InDesign file, I have to make sure that that word varnish is spelled the same and capitalized the same, so that InDesign understands that's all one varnish. If there's any difference in the name, even capitalization, it thinks, oh, there's two varnishes. And of course I want it to be a spot color. And again, this build doesn't matter. The color mode really doesn't matter, although if I change it to RGB maybe it will render a little brighter on screen, and be a little more obvious. By the way, you may notice this little triangle with the alert in it is just saying well, we can't really do that in process, we're warning you, that's okay. I'm going to create a separate layer for my varnish, you don't have to but I just sort of like to keep things separate, just so it's easier to keep track of things.

So I'm going to make a new layer and I'm just going to name it varnish. Because I want the shape of the varnish to correspond to the shapes that are already in the page, half my work's really done. So I'm going to select this flower and I'm going to shift click to get this. Now, these are grouped together, the text and the ampersand, but that's actually going to help me with a little problem that I need to fix. In order to duplicate, I'm just going to hold down Option or Alt and I'm going to drag that little square from layer one up into the varnish layer. And you'll notice that the handles change color, and the selections change color to sort of ear mark it as being now on layer varnish.

When I turn off varnish It goes away when I turn off layer one and turn back on varnish you can see that, that artwork's been duplicated. Always good to double check. So I'm going to select the big flower and I'm going to change its color to varnish. Now the big flower is actually using a 50% tint of the spot color but I don't want 50% of the varnish I want solid varnish. But you'll notice that when I apply the varnish color it takes on that percentage. So I need to remember to come up to color and drag that up to 100. Now for Hansel and petal, where that overlaps, I only want the varnish where you see blue now. So I want it just to correspond to the little flower shape. I don't want varnish on the letters.

So I need to knock out the varnish. I need to make sure that varnish doesn't happen there. So I'm just going to double click, to put myself in Isolation mode. I love Isolation mode, select the text, come to the Swatches panel, and fill the text with white. Now white in Illustrator doesn't mean white ink, it means, well, it means no ink prints here. So, now, you can see that's exactly the shape I want in my varnish, I don't want it going into the letters, and covering up parts of the letters. I'm going to hit escape to exit my isolation mode. I'm going to select this shape, double click to get in to isolation mode and get this and I'm going to apply that spot ddvarnisj again. And as you saw with the big flower, it's taking on the tint value, so I want to make that 100%.

Hit escape. And then get my other little piece. The little ampersand by double clicking again. I could've also said select All Same Fill Color. That would work too. Back again, apply the varnish, change that from 40% to 100. And now, I think I'm good to go, except for one thing. So let me show what happens if we don't change an attribute of that varnish. Remember that one of your most valuable forensic tools in Illustrator is overprint preview, coupled with separations preview. So I'm going to go to Window>Separations Preview.

And it doesn't activate separations preview unless you turn on overprint preview. So, again, you get a better view of what your color is. But this is pretty important. If I turn off varnish. Hey, what happened to my blue? Knocked it all out. By default fill colors in Illustrator are opaque. So they get rid of whatever's underneath. So if we were to image this job, the way it is now, we wouldn't have the blue in the ampersand, and the two flowers. So we need to do something special to these varnish shapes. So I'm going to select this one, And go to select same fill color.

So then I have all the little varnish shapes and I'm going to set them to over print. And here's where you do that. Under window an attributes. And this is one of those things that's sort of hiding down in the corners. Look little tiny checkbox over print fill. An now you can see a change in the color and the reason is now it's showing you that green. Coupled with the blue of the artwork underneath. And we can double check by looking here in Separations Preview. If it hasn't knocked out, when we turn off the little eyeball by varnish, the blue is still there. So remember this, any time you create a varnish, be consistent with the name If it's going to be combined with other components in InDesign later on. And also remember to take those varnish shapes, and always set their attribute to overprint.

So a little reminder, because it's not a panel you use very often. It's under Window, which is where all panels are, Attributes, and Overprint Fill. Now, these shapes don't have strokes on them, but just for future reference, if you ever need to do that to a stroke There it is, overprint stroke. And that's one of the main jobs in the Attributes panel, is just set things to overprint. So now, I know that this is built correctly, I have my little spot varnishes, and when this job is printed, and the varnish is applied, those little areas are going to be a little shinier, and so it's just going to sort of call attention to them. It just sort of emphasizes them.

It's a subtle way without changing colors to call attention to certain important spots in a design.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Print Production Essentials: Spot Colors and Varnish
 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 37s
    1. Welcome
      1m 31s
    2. What you should know before watching this course
      33s
    3. Using the exercise files
      33s
  2. 19m 15s
    1. Why spot colors are necessary
      2m 32s
    2. Examples of spot color impact
      1m 45s
    3. Spot or process: Making the decision
      5m 31s
    4. Choosing a spot color
      4m 11s
    5. About the new Pantone Plus color system
      5m 16s
  3. 13m 23s
    1. How spot color inks are created
      6m 8s
    2. Considerations when using certain spot colors
      2m 35s
    3. Effects of stock on color
      2m 6s
    4. Proofing spot and special-mix colors before printing
      1m 0s
    5. Spot colors and digital printing
      1m 34s
  4. 5m 5s
    1. How spot varnishes can enhance a project
      1m 10s
    2. How varnishes, inks, and substrate interact
      2m 30s
    3. Combining different types of varnish to add dimensions
      35s
    4. Aqueous flood coatings
      50s
  5. 28m 26s
    1. Creating a multitone image (duotone and tritone)
      10m 59s
    2. Creating a simple spot color channel
      6m 30s
    3. Creating a touch plate to enhance a color image
      7m 25s
    4. Creating a spot varnish
      3m 32s
  6. 23m 14s
    1. Adding Pantone color swatches
      5m 18s
    2. Using Overprint Preview to proof the display of spot color transparency
      2m 58s
    3. 3D shading: Preview with overprint on
      2m 22s
    4. Converting spot colors to process
      3m 11s
    5. Creating a varnish
      5m 52s
    6. Creating spot gradients
      3m 33s
  7. 17m 44s
    1. Importing art containing spot color content and resolving issues with Ink Manager
      4m 28s
    2. Using Overprint Preview to proof the display of spot color transparency
      2m 30s
    3. Converting spot colors to process
      2m 29s
    4. Creating a spot varnish
      5m 35s
    5. Creating and using mixed inks
      2m 42s
  8. 7m 10s
    1. Examining with Output Preview
      4m 11s
    2. Using preflight profiles
      2m 59s
  9. 1m 9s
    1. What I hope you've learned in this course
      51s
    2. Next steps
      18s

Start learning today

Get unlimited access to all courses for just $25/month.

Become a member
Sometimes @lynda teaches me how to use a program and sometimes Lynda.com changes my life forever. @JosefShutter
@lynda lynda.com is an absolute life saver when it comes to learning todays software. Definitely recommend it! #higherlearning @Michael_Caraway
@lynda The best thing online! Your database of courses is great! To the mark and very helpful. Thanks! @ru22more
Got to create something yesterday I never thought I could do. #thanks @lynda @Ngventurella
I really do love @lynda as a learning platform. Never stop learning and developing, it’s probably our greatest gift as a species! @soundslikedavid
@lynda just subscribed to lynda.com all I can say its brilliant join now trust me @ButchSamurai
@lynda is an awesome resource. The membership is priceless if you take advantage of it. @diabetic_techie
One of the best decision I made this year. Buy a 1yr subscription to @lynda @cybercaptive
guys lynda.com (@lynda) is the best. So far I’ve learned Java, principles of OO programming, and now learning about MS project @lucasmitchell
Signed back up to @lynda dot com. I’ve missed it!! Proper geeking out right now! #timetolearn #geek @JayGodbold
Share a link to this course

What are exercise files?

Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course. Save time by downloading the author's files instead of setting up your own files, and learn by following along with the instructor.

Can I take this course without the exercise files?

Yes! If you decide you would like the exercise files later, you can upgrade to a premium account any time.

Become a member Download sample files See plans and pricing

Please wait... please wait ...
Upgrade to get access to exercise files.

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Learn by watching, listening, and doing, Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along Premium memberships include access to all exercise files in the library.


Exercise files

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

For additional information on downloading and using exercise files, watch our instructional video or read the instructions in the FAQ.

This course includes free exercise files, so you can practice while you watch the course. To access all the exercise files in our library, become a Premium Member.

Join now "Already a member? Log in

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched?

This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.


Mark all as unwatched Cancel

Congratulations

You have completed Print Production Essentials: Spot Colors and Varnish.

Return to your organization's learning portal to continue training, or close this page.


OK
Become a member to add this course to a playlist

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses—and create as many playlists as you like.

Get started

Already a member?

Become a member to like this course.

Join today and get unlimited access to the entire library of video courses.

Get started

Already a member?

Exercise files

Learn by watching, listening, and doing! Exercise files are the same files the author uses in the course, so you can download them and follow along. Exercise files are available with all Premium memberships. Learn more

Get started

Already a Premium member?

Exercise files video

How to use exercise files.

Ask a question

Thanks for contacting us.
You’ll hear from our Customer Service team within 24 hours.

Please enter the text shown below:

The classic layout automatically defaults to the latest Flash Player.

To choose a different player, hold the cursor over your name at the top right of any lynda.com page and choose Site preferencesfrom the dropdown menu.

Continue to classic layout Stay on new layout
Exercise files

Access exercise files from a button right under the course name.

Mark videos as unwatched

Remove icons showing you already watched videos if you want to start over.

Control your viewing experience

Make the video wide, narrow, full-screen, or pop the player out of the page into its own window.

Interactive transcripts

Click on text in the transcript to jump to that spot in the video. As the video plays, the relevant spot in the transcript will be highlighted.

Are you sure you want to delete this note?

No

Your file was successfully uploaded.

Thanks for signing up.

We’ll send you a confirmation email shortly.


Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

Keep up with news, tips, and latest courses with emails from lynda.com.

Sign up and receive emails about lynda.com and our online training library:

Here’s our privacy policy with more details about how we handle your information.

   
submit Lightbox submit clicked
Terms and conditions of use

We've updated our terms and conditions (now called terms of service).Go
Review and accept our updated terms of service.