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Creating a spot varnish

From: Print Production Essentials: Spot Colors and Varnish

Video: Creating a spot varnish

This is, part of a project that we're doing for the Roux Academy of Art, Media and Design, and we want to make it, just a little bit higher quality. So, what I want to do is, I want to create a spot varnish that's just going to cover, the photographer here. Now I could do that, in Photoshop, but I'm going to show you kind of a neat way to do this within InDesign. And the success of it depends on me having a path in that Photoshop file, that I can invoke in order to serve as a home for my spot varnish. First, I'm going to make the swatch for the spot varnish.

Creating a spot varnish

This is, part of a project that we're doing for the Roux Academy of Art, Media and Design, and we want to make it, just a little bit higher quality. So, what I want to do is, I want to create a spot varnish that's just going to cover, the photographer here. Now I could do that, in Photoshop, but I'm going to show you kind of a neat way to do this within InDesign. And the success of it depends on me having a path in that Photoshop file, that I can invoke in order to serve as a home for my spot varnish. First, I'm going to make the swatch for the spot varnish.

So I'm just going to choose New Color Swatch. Now, this is going to be a spot color, because it's going to represent that varnish. Now, it's Color Mode frankly wouldn't matter, but I tend to want to make the varnish representation kind of loud, so I can recognized it in the pack. So, I'm just going to make it a nice bright green. Again the color doesn't really matter, the name does. So, I'm going to name this varnish, and I need to make sure that if I'm going to knit this back into an existing InDesign file, I need to make sure that the name is consistent with the name for the varnish in other parts of the file.

So, when I click OK. There we go. Now, you might notice the way this is represented in the Swatches panel, the little spot icon tells you that it's spot. The RGB tells you that it's RGB, but it doesn't really have color, right? It's really just going to represent one output and that's for that spot varnish. This is just InDesigns way of telling you hey, I'm using RGB values, because that's what you told me. To try to render this on screen, and that's all that signifies. So, in this image, I actually have a path, and this is what I'm going to use as a bases.

I'm going to make it a little bit easier on myself, by going into the Layers panel, and I love this about InDesign, you can look at the individual objects, and address them. So, I'm going to duplicate him, and I'm just going to drag him down to the New Object, so now I have two of him, there's the original. And I'm going to turn off the original, and then turn on this new one, and select it. I'm going to go to Object > Clipping Path > Options, and I'm going to check Preview, and it's not really going to change much. But when I choose Photoshop Path, it recognizes that path in the document, so this is one of the cool things about InDesign and Photoshop and Illustrator, sort of an ecosystem. And if you think of InDesign as sort of the mixing bowl, it understands the way the Illustrator and Photoshop files behave, it understands whats in those files.

And that's why it can be aware of this path. Then you can do funny things like invert it and get rid of the photographer, but what I want is this shape. Now I could of gone to Photoshop and copied that path and tried to paste it in position. But this is kind of a neater way to do this, I think. So, I'm going to click OK. And now I just have the photographer, but I don't need the photographer. I have him in that other instance of the image. What I need is just the shape, so here's what I'm going to do. I'm going to keep the shape, but I'm going to get rid of the image.

So, when I go to Object, and Clipping Path, here we go Convert Clipping Path to Frame, because right now the frame, is that enclosure. You can see the blue outline, that's the frame, and then within it we're isolating part of the image by invoking that path. But when I choose Object > Clipping Path > Convert Clipping Path to Frame, it gets rid of that original rectangular frame and it leaves just that little edge. And it might be a little hard to see, I'm going to turn on my frame edges. Can you see that little blue outline? Now there's the rectangular bounding box, don't let that confuse you.

Now there is a frame shaped like the guy. That's great, but I don't need the guy, I just need the frame. So, I'm going to switch to the Direct Selection tool, and when I click you can tell by the change in the color that what I'm talking to now is the image, not the container, and I'm just going to delete. See, there we go. There's my photographer's shape. And now I can select that shape and I can go into my Swatches panel and I can apply that varnish. Now it looks a little dull here, but remember color doesn't matter, it's just really a way to identify it.

Now back in my Layers panel, I'm going to turn the original image back on. If I were to out put this, this is what's going to happen. I'm just going to have a knock out shape, on top of him. So, just to kind of prove that, if I go to Window > Output > Separations Preview, turn on Separations Preview, if I turn off the varnish, see it would knock the guy out, we don't want that, we want it to overprint. So, what we have to do is select this shape, and do one of two things. Either set it to multiply using Blend Mode, or you can go to Window > Output, and Attributes. It's kind of buried, there.

You have to sort of search for it. And this is really its only job. It lets me designate this as overprinting, and immediately you can see what's going to happen. Now remember, it's not going to be a green varnish. He's not going to turn green. The green's just to help me identify the area, but now I have something that's going to make this look just a little bit better when that spot varnish is applied. It's just going to sort of make him pop out, because he's going to be shining, everything around him is going to be a little duller, because the colors grayscale, and because it's going to be on sort of matte stock.

So, it's going to really give him the illusion of a little bit of dimensionality. And look how easy that was to create, so just remember the trick here was that I had a path in my Photoshop file. I could invoke it here in InDesign, and then I could keep that path, and then get rid of the image inside, and use that path, just as a carrier for my varnish. And it's a really great trick, it's a great way, to enhance a printed piece, and give it a little bit more depth and dimension.

Show transcript

This video is part of

Image for Print Production Essentials: Spot Colors and Varnish
 
Expand all | Collapse all
  1. 2m 37s
    1. Welcome
      1m 31s
    2. What you should know before watching this course
      33s
    3. Using the exercise files
      33s
  2. 19m 15s
    1. Why spot colors are necessary
      2m 32s
    2. Examples of spot color impact
      1m 45s
    3. Spot or process: Making the decision
      5m 31s
    4. Choosing a spot color
      4m 11s
    5. About the new Pantone Plus color system
      5m 16s
  3. 13m 23s
    1. How spot color inks are created
      6m 8s
    2. Considerations when using certain spot colors
      2m 35s
    3. Effects of stock on color
      2m 6s
    4. Proofing spot and special-mix colors before printing
      1m 0s
    5. Spot colors and digital printing
      1m 34s
  4. 5m 5s
    1. How spot varnishes can enhance a project
      1m 10s
    2. How varnishes, inks, and substrate interact
      2m 30s
    3. Combining different types of varnish to add dimensions
      35s
    4. Aqueous flood coatings
      50s
  5. 28m 26s
    1. Creating a multitone image (duotone and tritone)
      10m 59s
    2. Creating a simple spot color channel
      6m 30s
    3. Creating a touch plate to enhance a color image
      7m 25s
    4. Creating a spot varnish
      3m 32s
  6. 23m 14s
    1. Adding Pantone color swatches
      5m 18s
    2. Using Overprint Preview to proof the display of spot color transparency
      2m 58s
    3. 3D shading: Preview with overprint on
      2m 22s
    4. Converting spot colors to process
      3m 11s
    5. Creating a varnish
      5m 52s
    6. Creating spot gradients
      3m 33s
  7. 17m 44s
    1. Importing art containing spot color content and resolving issues with Ink Manager
      4m 28s
    2. Using Overprint Preview to proof the display of spot color transparency
      2m 30s
    3. Converting spot colors to process
      2m 29s
    4. Creating a spot varnish
      5m 35s
    5. Creating and using mixed inks
      2m 42s
  8. 7m 10s
    1. Examining with Output Preview
      4m 11s
    2. Using preflight profiles
      2m 59s
  9. 1m 9s
    1. What I hope you've learned in this course
      51s
    2. Next steps
      18s

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