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Fundamentals of Software Version Control
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The history of version control


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Fundamentals of Software Version Control

with Michael Lehman

Video: The history of version control

Before we begin using the modern Version Control Systems, a little bit of history is worth looking at. The first Version Control System was created in 1972 at Bell Labs where they developed UNIX. The first one was called SCCS. It was available only for UNIX and only worked with Source Code files. Ten years later the Revision Control System, or RCS, was developed, and it was the first cross-platform version control system, but once again, it was only for text files. Both SCCS and RCS only worked on the development system and were not for sharing code, as they only worked for a single user.
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  1. 2m 12s
    1. Welcome
      56s
    2. What you should know before taking this course
      23s
    3. Using the exercise files
      53s
  2. 25m 8s
    1. Overview of software version control
      2m 51s
    2. Understanding version control concepts
      5m 14s
    3. Demo one: Getting started
      11m 1s
    4. Demo two: Handling the "oops"
      6m 2s
  3. 11m 3s
    1. The history of version control
      3m 44s
    2. Terminology
      4m 27s
    3. Exploring centralized vs. distributed systems
      2m 52s
  4. 28m 42s
    1. Getting files in and out of a repository
      4m 38s
    2. Saving changes and tracking history
      2m 47s
    3. Reverting to a prior version
      1m 42s
    4. Creating tags and labels
      1m 5s
    5. Branching and merging
      4m 10s
    6. Exploring workflow integration and continuous builds
      2m 46s
    7. Using graphical user interface (GUI) tools
      2m 39s
    8. Integrating a version control system with an integrated development environment (IDE)
      2m 50s
    9. Examining shell integration
      3m 26s
    10. Looking at forward and reverse integration
      2m 39s
  5. 25m 59s
    1. Installation and setup
      3m 31s
    2. Creating a repository and a project
      5m 10s
    3. Working with check-in, checkout, and revert
      6m 12s
    4. Tagging
      1m 34s
    5. Branching and merging
      5m 32s
    6. Working with GUI clients and IDE integration
      4m 0s
  6. 16m 13s
    1. Installation and setup
      55s
    2. Working with check-in, checkout, and revert
      9m 34s
    3. Tagging
      1m 7s
    4. Branching and merging
      4m 37s
  7. 26m 41s
    1. Installation and setup
      3m 47s
    2. Creating a repository and a project
      6m 15s
    3. Working with check-in, checkout, and revert
      8m 31s
    4. Tracking history and tagging
      2m 15s
    5. Branching and merging
      5m 53s
  8. 19m 25s
    1. Installation and setup
      3m 1s
    2. Creating a repository and a project
      1m 6s
    3. Working with check-in, checkout, and revert
      6m 39s
    4. Tagging
      2m 13s
    5. Branching and merging
      3m 44s
    6. Working with GUI clients and IDE integration
      2m 42s
  9. 16m 54s
    1. Installation and setup
      1m 48s
    2. Creating a repository and a project
      59s
    3. Working with check-in, checkout, revert, and tracking history
      6m 9s
    4. Tagging
      1m 50s
    5. Branching and merging
      4m 29s
    6. Exploring GUI and shell integration
      1m 39s
  10. 3m 38s
    1. Selecting a software version control that is right for you
      2m 30s
    2. Next steps
      1m 8s

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Fundamentals of Software Version Control
2h 55m Intermediate Nov 07, 2012

Viewers: in countries Watching now:

This course is a gateway to learning software version control (SVC), process management, and collaboration techniques. Author Michael Lehman reviews the history of version control and demonstrates the fundamental concepts: check-in/checkout, forking, merging, commits, and distribution. The choice of an SVC system is critical to effectively managing and versioning the assets in a software development project (from source code, images, and compiled binaries to installation packages), so the course also surveys the solutions available. Michael examines Git, Perforce, Subversion, Mercurial, and Microsoft Team Foundation Server (TFS) in particular, describing the appropriate use, features, benefits, and optimal group size for each one.

Topics include:
  • Comparing centralized vs. distributed systems
  • Saving changes and tracking history
  • Using revert or rollback
  • Working with the GUI tools
  • Using IDE and shell integration
  • Installing different systems
  • Creating a repository
  • Tagging code
  • Branching and merging code
  • Selecting a software version control system that's right for you
Subjects:
Developer Mobile Apps Desktop Apps Programming Foundations
Software:
Git Mercurial ALM/TFS Perforce
Author:
Michael Lehman

The history of version control

Before we begin using the modern Version Control Systems, a little bit of history is worth looking at. The first Version Control System was created in 1972 at Bell Labs where they developed UNIX. The first one was called SCCS. It was available only for UNIX and only worked with Source Code files. Ten years later the Revision Control System, or RCS, was developed, and it was the first cross-platform version control system, but once again, it was only for text files. Both SCCS and RCS only worked on the development system and were not for sharing code, as they only worked for a single user.

The next wave of Version Control Software-- what we call Centralized Version Control-- was developed starting in 1986. The Concurrent Versions System, or CVS, was the first one that had a central repository and was usable by multiple users. It was still file-focused and kept track of changes in individual files, as opposed to keeping track of changes in entire directory trees. Later on in the 1980s, along came Perforce, and it was widely used during the .com era. It's still the biggest repository used inside Google.

In 2000, a new product called Subversion was created and supported non-text files, tracking directory structure changes, such as file renames and moves, and its transaction unit was the directory as opposed to an individual file. So you could check in an entire directory tree and check it out. In 2004, Microsoft created the Team Foundation Server to replace its aging Visual SourceSafe Version Control System, which was primarily a client server system. TFS comes with an MSDN subscription, which means it's fairly expensive.

But it also has a TFS Express edition which is usable for up to I believe 5 users. TFS has tight Visual Studio integration. That means you can check in and check out right from inside Visual Studio. It supports not only source code control, but also has bug and work item tracking and features for doing automated testing. The next generation of source code control software is called Distributed Source Code Control. Distributed Source Code Control is different in that there's not a central server that everybody shares. Everybody shares their own individual repository and then can share their changes with a central server or share their changes with individual users.

Distributed Source Code Control came about because of a change in licensing from a company called BitKeeper. Previously, they had a product which was used by Linus Torvalds and the kernel group on Linux that was called the Community Edition, and it was free. But in 2005, BitKeeper decided to make its entire product line commercial only, meaning you had to pay a fee for using it, and Linus decided that he wanted to make sure that everything around Linux was free, and so he created something called Git. It's broadly used in conjunction with something called GitHub which is an online cloud-based service which offers free hosting for open-source projects and also commercial hosting for private use.

A competing product Mercurial was also created in 2005 in response to the same BitKeeper change and is also widely used in open source projects. That's a short history of Version Control from 1972 to 2012. These days, pretty much everybody uses one of five systems, Perforce, Subversion, or TFS if they want a centralized system, Git or Mercurial if they want a distributed system. And now that we have looked at the history, let's move on to looking at a little bit more details about the terminology that we need to understand, and a walk-through about how centralized and distributed systems work.

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